Webcomics Wednesday: 3/28/12

For this week’s Webcomics Wednesday, I am reviewing LeyLines, which I discovered through the #lfwc hashtag on Twitter, and Hunter Black, which I had heard about but never checked out until after I met the creative team at WonderCon. Speaking of WonderCon, I will be sharing some links to the great artists I met there, too.

First up, LeyLines by Robin Dempsey. The story is actually very intricate, so I’ll start by sharing the logline from the site: “Three siblings from a broken family are caught in the conspiracy that claimed their mother’s life. To save their family and nation, they seek out ancient gods for answers — but the gods give nothing for free.” Of course, that barely scratches the surface of this fantasy story about High Sage Koruval va Naza, his daughter Mizha, son Tama, and adopted son Zhiro. The va Nazas are Tamakepe, a tall, pale race, while Zhiro is a Timu, a short, darker-skinned race. While Zhiro is technically part of the va Naza clan, there is some bad history between him and Mizha, perhaps to do with the fact that Timu are considered lower-caste.

If that seems like a lot of new words and information to get your brain around when reading a new webcomic, I wouldn’t worry. Ms. Dempsey shares bits and pieces of the story bible with each new page, so you can learn as you go, or you can just let the story unfold and all will be made clear. For those who enjoy seeing behind the scenes, Ms. Dempsey shares a wealth of information on characters, the land, the gods, the politics, language, etc. It is evident that she has done a huge amount of world-building and plotting before page one of the story, and this pays off more and more as the story goes on and you see how it all fits together. So far there are three chapters of about 40 pages each and Chapter 4 has just recently started, and already it bears re-reading the story to appreciate early events in light of later ones.

It would take me many paragraphs to lay out the story and all the characters so far in a way that does the comic justice, so instead I will just talk about what I am enjoying in the comic: 1) an extended, prophetic dream sequence in Chapter 1, and the commentary below it; 2) Mizha’s illusion powers; 3) the high-caste/low-caste forbidden love history between Mizha and Zhiro; 4) the hyper-alert but odd Pakku; 5) Ms. Dempsey’s ability to show subtle action taking place without needing a caption to describe the action (for example, this exchange); 6) nicely-laid out pages such as this one; and, of course, 7) whenever characters look like they are ready to kick some ass, like someone hiding knives under his robe.

LeyLines is an intricate fantasy story full of gods and intrigue, dreams and visions, base villains and plucky heroes, and genuine characters. Check it out!

Hunter Black, written by Justin Peniston and illustrated by William “Will” Orr, is an out and out fun fantasy noir. It is in greyscale with occasional use of color for emphasis (red blood, green cough SFX, yellow crazy eyes). The art is flat and geometric, and very angular, which looks really cool. I especially like the jagged, thick-pixel blood splatters (as in the picture to the right and also  here, but don’t follow the link if you don’t like spoilers). Mr. Orr’s art in Hunter Black reminds me a bit of Samurai Jack, which to me at least is a good thing.

The premise of the story is that Hunter Black took the fall for a huge crime and was sent to an inescapable prison, which he of course escapes from. While in prison he contracted a wasting disease and he would surely be dead already if not for his sword, The Revenger. When he uses Revenger to kill someone who betrayed someone else, the sword feeds him their life force. When he kills someone who didn’t betray anyone, things don’t work out as well. The magic sword reminds me of Michael Moorcock’s Elric and Fred Saberhagen’s Sword books, both of which I really like, so a story with a well-done magic sword is one I will tend to favor. The Revenger is a worthy addition to the ranks of famous magic swords, and there are apparently more of them out there in Hunter Black’s world, so I can’t wait for him to clash with the wielders of those weapons.

Anyway, back to the story: Hunter Black wants to find out who set him up, and he wants to kill them. It’s a simple setup but the payoff is in the characters that Black has to interact with and (often) fight along the way. As I mentioned in the LeyLines review above, I like it when characters kick ass, and Hunter Black, although only about 75 pages in, is already full of them. I am looking forward to following Black’s ups and downs as he Revenges his way through the world. Will he kill all his betrayers before they kill him or he falls prey to his sickness? Damn right he will, and we get to watch.

My only complaint, and a minor one, is that I wish each page had a comments section attached to it. As it stands, you can leave comments by going to a blog post that may or may not have been posted on the same day as the page you are reading, which makes it a bit confusing if you want to actively participate in the commenting.

I’m glad I met Mr. Peniston and Mr. Orr at WonderCon—and especially glad I picked up the three Hunter Black posters—or else I might not have gotten clued in to this awesome webcomic. Read it for yourself and watch the blood fly.

Speaking of WonderCon, I promised last week that I would share more about the art that my wife and I liked, so here are some links in no particular order:

Eunjung June Kim had some very nice, whimsical prints that my wife described as making her feel happy. Check out “Three Indian Girls,” “Fly pig,” “Bedtime Story,” heck any of her prints. They do make you feel happy.

I felt the same way about some prints by Pascal Campion. Check out “Midnight Friends” or “Cinemascope” on the first page of his store. I could totally put these up in my girls’ room, they are so sweet.

Along the same lines, we both liked Nidhi Chanani’s prints. Her express goal with her art is to make people happy, and she shares her art daily as a means of everyday love. Mission accomplished. I won’t even single any particular print out; any of them would be great to own.

In the just plain cool category, I really dug these East-meets-West prints from Moira Hahn. I especially like “Year of the Rooster/Attack of the Hummingbird” as it reminds me of some of my cat friends past, and “Year of the Rooster/Attack of the Tengu” because it is a samurai cat. ‘Nuff said.

Finally, last week I showed a picture of Arlyn Pillay of Ogre Shop working on a painting and he has since posted a sped-up video of him working on it. I am still blown away that he used leftover house paint to create such a cool piece.

Okay, that’s it for this week. Next week I will finish up my WonderCon sharing by talking about the handful of indie comics I picked up there.

Webzines: SF/F/H Markets (2 in a Series)

I have been researching SF/F/H webzines again, so today I have four more to share with you. I picked a recent short story from each one to read to get a feel for each webzine (I would of course read more stories before submitting one, to get a deeper sense of what the editors are looking for), and I will share my thoughts on those as well. Click here for my first post in this series, or check out my Links page for quick links to the webzines I have researched.

Abyss & Apex: Magazine of Speculative Fiction accepts a wide range of genres, but make sure to check out the Submissions page for the ones they are not looking for, such as horror. They are looking for short stories up to 10,000 words in length, and especially flash fiction up to 1,500 words. Payment is 5 cents a word up to 1,500 words or $75.00 for longer stories. As of the writing of this post, they are currently overstocked on stories, but their next reading period is open again starting 5/1/12, so now is a perfect time to read through the stories on the site and then have a story ready to submit on May 1st.

The story I read from Abyss & Apex was A Time to Weep by Daniel Huddleston. It is about humans doing business on an alien world, with human and aliens working together in the same office. One of the alien workers has a tragedy in his family that affects his work, and for good or ill, his human boss intervenes to try to help him out. Mr. Huddleston really gets across the future history in the story and the alien beliefs and behaviors in a remarkably short amount of time, so that even though I was dropped into the story with no reference points, I was able to appreciate the central conflict without needing a ton of exposition beforehand.

The Future Fire describes itself as publishing social, political and progressive speculative fiction, and you can see the site for more examples of what they mean by that. 10,000 words is the upper limit of what they are looking for and they pay a flat rate of $35 per story. The next Call for Submissions is for the theme of Outlaw Bodies: “stories about the future of human bodies that break boundaries—legal, societal, [and] biological…,” and the deadline is 5/1/12.
From The Future Fire, I read Bilaadi by S. Ali, which is about a river god who is forced to change with the times. It has environmental and socio-political themes to it, as one would expect given the focus of the webzine, but it was touching and personal at the same time. A snapshot of our modern world as seen through the eyes of an ancient being.

Quantum Muse is interesting in that to submit stories, you have to first sign up to critique stories that other writers have submitted. To cut down on their workload, the editors rely on this method of peer review to weed out stories, with only the top-ranked stories being forwarded to the editors for possible inclusion in the magazine. Interesting. Registration is free although they do ask for your address and phone number. I signed up and there are currently three SF, five fantasy, and six alternative stories to critique. You have to critique three stories for each one story you want to submit. I will have to try this out and let you know how it goes. Note: Flash fiction stories of 1,000 words or less can be submitted without going through the whole process described above. The word limit for longer stories is 8,000 words. Payment appears to be publication only plus the chance that a reader might “tip” you through PayPal. If Quantum Muse itself pays for the story, I am somehow not seeing that on the Submissions page.

From Quantum Muse, I read The Zitzing Man by Harris Tobias, which is a very short story about a great invention that would have worked if only the mundane world hadn’t intruded.

Electric Spec focuses on science fiction, fantasy, and the macabre and accepts stories from 250-7,000 words. Their next reading period ends April 15 for the end of May issue. Payment is a flat $20 per story. Check out the Submissions page for full details.

From Electric Spec, I read Seasonal Fruit by Kathryn Board. It was a fun short story about modern mortals interacting with divine beings. At first I thought it was going to be a clichéd horror story but it took an unexpected and pleasant turn and actually sent me to Wikipedia to look up some background information (the story is self-contained, so you don’t need to do this, but it caught my interest and made me want to research further).

So there you have it, four more cool science-fiction, fantasy, and/or horror webzines to check out, either as a reader, a writer or both. Every time I research these webzines my mind kicks into high gear about stories I can write. Hopefully once I recover from my recent move from Southern to Northern California, I will be able to carve out more writing time!

Final note: I am using a new-to-me website called Readability to help me read stories and articles from the web more easily. I am using it to send stories to my Kindle and Android tablet for easier reading in more comfortable environments. It looks like it works for the iPad and iPhone, too. It is free and I have no stake in it, but I wanted to share because every time I get to read a story on my Kindle in a comfy chair or in bed rather than sitting in front of the computer, I think, “This is so great!”

Until next time, thank you for reading and please let me know what you like about my blog, what you don’t like, what you want to see more of, sites/books/comics I should check out, etc. Thanks again!

Webzines: One in a Series

So far on Lithicbee I have been reviewing webcomics, searching for e-books from some of my favorite authors, waxing philosophical, and sharing pieces of a rough draft end-of-the-world story. With today’s post I am going to add another topic I am interested in finding more information about: webzine/e-zines. Specifically, science-fiction/fantasy/horror webzines. For all the posts in this series, click here.

As an aspiring writer, I really need to see what other writers are doing to get their name and stories out there, so I am going to make a concerted effort to find new (to me) markets and start reading a lot more short fiction. I have to admit, I am not always fond of short fiction. Perhaps as Stephen King speculates, I have fallen out of love with the short story. Well, this is me trying to rekindle the romance. Just as I search for and talk about webcomics on this blog, I am going to do the same with SF/F/Horror (aka speculative fiction) webzines/e-zines. I will add them to my Links page as I go along, in case anyone else might find a list of genre markets useful as well.

I’ll start with OG’s Speculative Fiction. According to the site, “Our goal is to eventually be considered a professional market by Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, which means we need a circulation of at least 1,000 and we need to pay 5 cents a word. In the future we might look to add an editorial, book reviews, and author interviews every month. We want to grow!”

I picked up Issue 34 on Amazon for 99 cents. (I guess I could have gotten it for free as a Prime member, but, c’mon, 99 cents!) It included two stories, an Editor’s Letter, and a poem. While the goal might be to pay 5 cents a word, right now they pay $35 per story for one-time and some reprint rights. Stories should be less than 8,000 words, preferably less than 5,000 words. It looks like they have a new issue every two months.

Schlock! Webzine is a weekly zine that just put out its 46th edition. According to the site, “Schlock! is an exciting new weekly webzine dedicated to short stories, flash fiction, serialised novels and novellas within the genres of science fiction, fantasy and horror. We publish new and old works of pulp sword and sorcery, urban fantasy, dark fantasy and gothic horror. If you want to read quality works of schlock fantasy, science fiction or horror, Schlock! is the webzine for you!”

Shlock! publishes weekly and include several stories in each issue. Payment is publication of your work. You retain all rights to your work and they are currently accepting submissions. There is also a very comprehensive Webzine Links page that I am sure I will be making use of in the coming months.

The Were-Traveler has four volumes a year on a specific theme. From the site: “The Were-Traveler is an online webzine dedicated to really short fiction. When I say really short fiction, I mean REALLY short. Drabbles and micro-fic mostly, with the occasional flash piece or short story (up to 2000 words) thrown in whenever I have time to read longer pieces. What I’m looking for here is speculative fiction. It’s what I write, it’s what I enjoy reading. Fantasy, science fiction, horror and any combination of the three have a good chance of getting published here.” Drabbles are 100-word stories, for those who don’t know. (I didn’t.)

The next call for submissions is for innovative vampire revenge stories, due by April 30th. Payment is publication of your work.

Ray Gun Revival focuses on space opera stories of no more than 4,000 words. It pays $0.01-$0.05 per word up to 4,000 words, to be paid via PayPal. It asks for “First Rights and specifically First Internet Publication, with an option on First Anthology Rights for 18 months.” It also recommends reading the contract that you agree to when you submit “very carefully.” At first this kind of scared me, but it is actually what one should be doing anyway, so at least they make an effort to point it out.

So, there you have it, the first in a series of my research into webzine SF/F/Horror markets. Just checking these zines out and reading the stories on them really gets me wanting to submit stories again. If you know of a zine you think I should check out, please feel free to drop me a line.

Michael Moorcock E-Books

Michael Moorcock, his Eternal Champion books, and most specifically his Elric and Hawkmoon series, were a major influence on my early writing style. To this day, the concepts of the balance of Law and Chaos, the multiverse, and the doomed antihero still work their way into a lot of my ideas. So if I want to convert my physical collection of Eternal Champion books into e-books, am I in luck? Let’s see.

First up is Elric. The latest edition of the Elric stories, released by Del Rey, is available in e-book format on Amazon: Elric: The Stealer of Souls; Elric: To Rescue Tanelorn; Elric: The Sleeping Sorceress; Duke Elric; Elric in the Dream Realms; and Elric: Swords and Roses, all for $11.99 each. Amazon also has the more recent Elric/Oona Von Bek sequence: The Dreamthief’s Daughter, The Skrayling Tree, and The White Wolf’s Son, for $12.99, $10.99, and $6.99 respectively. (What’s up with the funky pricing, Hachette Book Group?)

Next up are the Hawkmoon books: The Jewel in the Skull, The Mad God’s Amulet, The Sword of the Dawn, and The Runestaff, which are $9.99 each.

Okay, so Elric and Hawkmoon are available, that’s pretty good, but what about Corum? No. Erekose/John Daker? Nope. Von Bek, Oswald Bastable, Jerry Cornelius, Count Brass? Nah. The fabulous Second Ether sequence? Forget it. Okay, you get my point: Where are all of these e-books?! Well, according to Mr. Moorcock in a 2/1/12 post on his website, Moorcock’s Miscellany, “I just signed the first of many contracts with Orion. This one will release minor works ONLY as e-books but the rest of my books (pretty much all of them apart from Mother London, King of the City, London Peculiar and the Pyat books) should be published in the UK from this year on and be available as e-books or paper.” In an earlier post, he stated that “The process might be slower in the US but Titan will publish Bastable as e-books.” So, not perfect news for US readers, but at least there appears to be some progress being made.

Diane Duane E-Books

I still get visits from Google searches for some variant of “C.J. Cherryh e-books,” which reminds me that one of the reasons I started this blog was to collect links to authors’ e-books. So for my second post in the series I am going to discuss science-fiction and fantasy novelist Diane Duane.

I first discovered Diane Duane through the Thieves’ World series (much the same as how I found Ms. Cherryh!). The first two books of the Thieves’ World series are collected into one e-book, Thieves’ World: First Blood, but Ms. Duane did not contribute to the series until the sixth book and I will probably do a whole post on Thieves’ World at some point, so… moving on!

At some point I got a Science Fiction Book Club omnibus edition of the first three books in Ms. Duane’s Young Wizards series: So You Want to Be a Wizard, Deep Wizardry, and High Wizardry. The first book is about a young girl named Nita who lives on Long Island, is frequently bullied, and who ends up becoming a wizard along with new friend Kit. As a young boy who lived on Long Island, was frequently bullied, and who wouldn’t have minded becoming a wizard, So You Want to Be a Wizard quickly became one of my favorite books. I have owned it in that original SFBC version, a 5-in-1 SFBC version, a paperback, and now an e-book version.

I re-read So You Want to Be a Wizard this week and although I am not that child anymore who discovered the book for the first time, I still enjoyed reading the book. These books are about magic and wizards, but it is a very science-fiction-based magic system, and the wizards are more like computer programmers who have access to the code that the universe runs on (known as the Speech in the books). Change the code, change the universe. Their job as wizards is to keep the universe running and slow down its eventual heat-death. It is a neat concept and a little different from what you would expect in a book about wizards.

The Young Wizards series is available from Diane Duane’s website, where you can buy it direct from the site or from links to the major e-book sellers out there. What’s interesting is that there are separate links for buyers from the U.S.A., from Canada, and for international (non-North American) buyers. I actually purchased the international versions even though I reside in the U.S.A. because you can purchase those directly from Ms. Duane’s site and because they are DRM-free. So when I opened So You Want to Be a Wizard and saw that it didn’t have chapter breaks (the lack of which is a pet peeve of mine), I was able to open it up in Calibre, convert it to an epub, add the chapter breaks in Sigil, and convert it back to a mobi for my Kindle. I know not everyone wants or needs this freedom, but for me it is nice.

Ms. Duane’s website also has links to her Middle Kingdoms series (The Door into Fire, The Door into Shadow, The Door into Sunset), Feline Wizards series (The Book of Night with Moon, To Visit the Queen), the stand-alone novel Stealing the Elf-King’s Roses, and the short story collection Uptown Local and Other Interventions. There is also one book, A Wind from the South, that is advertised in a sidebar only and so might be-overlooked; according to Ms. Duane’s Wikipedia entry, this book is previously unpublished and was released as an e-book only.

Amazon has more of Ms. Duane’s books available than she lists on her web site, mostly in the Star Trek universe and in a series of Young Adult books called Tom Clancy’s Net Force of which I am wholly unfamiliar. The full list of her available books on Amazon is here; just select Kindle Edition to see e-books only.

Looking over all the e-books that are available, I can only think, “Why haven’t I read so many of these books?” I think I fell out of touch with Ms. Duane’s books somewhere along the way. Maybe once I left young-adulthood, I was less inclined to read these tales. I recently purchased all nine Young Wizards books from her site and I am looking forward to re-reading the first five or six (I can’t remember if I read the sixth book yet) and reading the rest for the first time. I have a feeling that after that I will be returning to Ms. Duane’s site to check out her other books. It’s never too late to be a kid (or young adult) again.

(Note: In researching authors’ e-book availability, I focus on what books, if any, the author has available for download on their own site or their site of choice, and what Amazon has available. Since I don’t own a Nook or a Sony Reader, I don’t check the availability on those sites anymore, although it is usually a mirror of what is available on Amazon.)

C.J. Cherryh E-Books (Updated with Good News)

This post is an update to my 8/30/11 post about which C.J. Cherryh e-books are available.

Since that time, books 1 and 10 of the Foreigner series have been added to the Kindle Store on Amazon.com, while books 2-6 are still MIA. Also, Alternate Realities is also available for the Kindle now, and is a great deal at only $7.99 for the three-book collection. (Most of the books available are priced at $7.99, which is nice.)

Despite the books that are on Amazon or on the author’s own Closed Circle website, there remains a gaping hole in Cherryh’s bibliography for those of us hoping to port our physical book collection into the digital world.

I e-mailed Ms. Cherryh to ask about these “missing” books and her thoughts on e-books in general. She kindly replied and here is what I learned.

There are indeed plans to release more of her books, both on Amazon (and other such websites), and the Closed Circle site. Per Ms. Cherryh: “I had some rights to part of Foreigner; DAW and I conferred, traded, and now you’ll be seeing more DAW e-books on Amazon et al., and some of my earlier non-series works on Closed Circle.” She describes the process of converting her physical books into e-books as “practically a comma by comma revision process into CSS” and not just a matter of scanning pages. This gives me some comfort because there is nothing worse than buying an e-book and realizing it is a scan-and-sell job (although when this has happened to me, Amazon has been excellent about giving me a refund).

Finally, I asked Ms. Cherryh about her feelings toward e-books in general and whether she sees the conversion of her books as a positive thing. She replied, “Change is [positive]. It was bound to happen. Piracy is a problem–but it’s a funny thing: people who understand the point of my books and like what I write are not thieves and do not have the mindset of thieves, and when they’ve gotten a pirated copy not knowing there was a problem, they’ve kindly come to Closed Circle and dropped a donation in the bucket.”

So, more C.J. Cherryh books are on the way, and Book 13 in the Foreigner series is set to be released on 3/6/12 (which should give me time to re-read the last few books to get back into the atevi-human mindset). Good news for fans of Ms. Cherryh’s works!

4/1/12 update: Per Ms. Cherryh’s website, she is close to adding Chernevog and Yvgenie to the Closed Circle site, with major changes made to Yvgenie.

C.J. Cherryh E-Books

If you are a C.J. Cherryh fan and want to read her books on your Kindle, nook, iPad or other e-reader, the pickings are slim. On Amazon, there is little rhyme or reason as to what is available. On the science-fiction side, books 7,8,9, 11, and 12 of her Foreigner series are up, with book 13 available for pre-order, but 1-6 and 10 are not there, so hold on to your hard copies. (It looks like book 10, Conspirator, should be available, but it is not showing up for me.) The two books of the Hanan Rebellion, Brothers of Earth and Hunter of Worlds, are available in one volume, At the Edge of Space. Hammerfall and Forge of Heaven, the two books of the Gene Wars, are also available.

On the fantasy side, all five books of her Fortress series are available.

It is nice that these books are available on Amazon, but it does leave a gaping hole in Cherryh’s bibliography as far as e-books go.

A few more e-books are available on the Closed Circle, which is the online presence for authors Lynn Abbey, C.J. Cherryh, and Jane Fancher. It appears to be intermittently updated but it is still alive, with the most current post being from 8/15/11, just about two weeks ago.

On Closed Circle, you can find: Heavy Time and Hellburner @ $5.00 each, Faery Moon and Rusalka @$9.95 each, and three volumes of The Writing Life: A Writer’s Journal, which is “an edited-for-legibility version of the online journal [she] kept for several years.” The first volume is free, so give it a try. Volumes two and three are $5.00 each.

You can find the stand-alone fantasy novel The Paladin on webscription.net, along with the shared world fantasy omnibus The Sword of Knowledge, although per Wikipedia, Cherryh did not actually write any of the included books.

If you have a nook or Sony Reader, you can also purchase Alternate Realities, which includes Port Eternity, Wave Without a Shore, and Voyager in Night, at Sony’s ReaderStore, or Barnes and Noble, but Kindle users are out of luck on this one.

Those are all the books I could find that are available (legitimately) as e-books. Hopefully one day we will also get the first six Foreigner books, the Chanur series, the rest of the Alliance-Union books, or even, dare I dream, the Merovingen Nights shared universe series. If you find anything else, please let me know and I will update the list.

Note: There is newer C.J. Cherryh ebook news here.

A repository for science-fiction/fantasy writing links.

I have been searching on and off for a) science-fiction and fantasy e-books other than those that can be found on Amazon, and b) science-fiction and fantasy writing markets. I have collected many links for both searches; there is no dearth of sites out there. What I have not been able to find is one site that collects all the links in one area. Or if I have, it is usually outdated.

I will use this site to add links and then check on them periodically to make sure that they are still live. If you have suggestions for either area, please share them.

Also, don’t get me wrong about looking for e-books other than Amazon. I love Amazon, it is a great resource, but some of the authors I enjoy reading do not have their books for sale there.

A Brief Search of Markets Reveals…

I ordered the 2012 Writer’s Market the other day, even though I have memories of it being a poor resource for Science Fiction and Fantasy markets. Still, I had not bought one of these books in years because, well, I haven’t been writing that much in years, so I thought I would give it another chance.

Alas, the SF&F section is woefully thin, at 11 entries. This includes Asimov’s Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Now, I don’t know about you, but as an unpublished writer, I would probably not bother with these bigger magazines to start with. Long story short, I found four markets I could try to send a short story to.

This is not to say the 2012 Writer’s Market is not worth the asking price; I still have the how-to articles to browse, and I bought the Deluxe edition, so I can check the online database for more markets, but it is a bit disappointing that so few SF&F markets were included in the book.

I searched on Google for “science fiction ezine” and “science fiction writing markets” and received plenty of good leads, so many that it will take me a while to sift through them all. Now that’s more like it.

Some examples, with the links going straight to their submission area: Lightspeedmagazine.com, Electric Spec, and this nice list of markets (which I have yet to delve into in depth).

I will explore and post about these magazines over time. Bottom line: Do not rely on Writer’s Market to find markets for you, as they do not appear to have tried to publish a very full listing.