Dreams: 4/6/12

I have seen dreams used a lot in the webcomics I have been reading lately, as prophecy and insight into past events in LeyLines, as the setting for Xander, as a vision of another world in Shadowbinders, and as a vision of the past in The Bean. All those dream references made me want to write a bit about dreams myself, since it is one of my favorite subjects. (4/8/12 Edit: I forgot to mention Power Nap, another great dream-oriented webcomic!)

I am fascinated by the dreaming world and the use of dreams in stories (can’t wait for my copy of The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath graphic novel to arrive!), and I have spent a lot of time recording my dreams and trying to explore them more fully. For one, they are a great source of story ideas. And for another, I cannot help the nagging suspicion that, as in H.P. Lovecraft’s Dream-Quest or in Xander, the land of dreams is a place, like the waking world, that persists over time.

That may sound fantastical and it is not something I would necessarily go to the mat for, but it is a fun idea. At the minimum, I think that perhaps our own personal dreamscapes persist over time, because of the number of locations I have visited in my dreams that I return to again and again. Nor are these locations frozen sets that are unaffected by the passage of time. Frequently when I visit them, there is a sense or outright confirmation that time has passed.

For instance, I mentioned on Wednesday that this house on a green hill in the webcomic Xander reminded me of a setting from my dreams. It is one I have not visited since childhood, but at the time it was a bakery or sweets shop of some sort. The last time I visited it in a dream, however, it was boarded up, disused, dusty. (I know, how’s that for some heavy, end-of-childhood symbolism.)

Another location I have visited numerous times is a mashup of an amusement park and a bazaar. I have been here so many times and from various entrances that I have literally drawn a map of the place. The parking structure, front entrance, business office, carnival games, bazaar, and rides remain in the same place, although the contents of the bazaar and the nature of the rides can change. The rides themselves are often gargantuan roller-coasters and water rides, while the bazaar has an inordinate amount of used book stores. (Actually, browsing imaginary books and comics in used book stores is a common, and favorite, dream for me.) So, is this all wish fulfillment for a kid who has never really grown up? Does the amusement park exist in my mind in some permanent way or am I making it up each time from my memories of previous dreams? Or is it truly a shared realm that other dreamers can visit?

Well, I suppose if anyone reads this and has been there, you show me your map and I’ll show you mine and we’ll go from there.

Leaving the question aside of whether or not dreams are a gateway to another actual place, my other fascination with dreams is how it is possible to “wake up” inside a dream. This is known as lucid dreaming and is the premise of the aforementioned Xander and the movie Inception (and now that I think of it, even an episode of Fraggle Rock, although I doubt they called it lucid dreaming). As I mentioned earlier this week, I once spent an inordinate amount of time exploring the practice of lucid dreaming. If you are interested in trying it or just reading about it, I recommend the books Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge and Creative Dreaming by Patricia Garfield.

The quick description of lucid dreaming is that you regain consciousness and control of your actions while you are still asleep and in a dream world rather than the waking world. It seems impossible at first and I remember thinking people were just making this up, but I eventually mastered the art of lucid dreaming, for a time, and I can say there is not quite any other experience like it and probably won’t be until we have some sort of virtual reality.

Like Xander, I had some fantastic “powers” I could wield when lucid, because I realized that “it was all a dream” and so I could effect changes on my environment. I could fly, I could walk through walls, and I could shake the dream up like an Etch-a-Sketch and remake it if it wasn’t going the way I liked it, like if it was getting too nightmarish.

I would try to program dreams by focusing on certain subjects before going to sleep, and I was able to have some very therapeutic encounters this way. It may seem trite or cliché, but in one dream I had gone to sleep with the intention to meet my younger self in the dream. I did, and he was being bullied, and I chased the bullies away and had a nice chat with myself about hanging in there. It felt very real and was quite cathartic.

Well, I could go on and on about my dreams, but I know that listening to other people’s dreams can be a tedious experience because it is so difficult to truly convey the emotions and knowledge that the dreamer feels while dreaming. Needless to say, I recommend trying to learn lucid dreaming if you have the time and the patience. (I haven’t had truly lucid dreams in a while. It is something that takes work and practice, and at this point in my life I don’t have the time to put into it.)

In the end, I remain fascinated by dreams and if you ever want to discuss them, feel free to comment here or you can find me on G+ or Facebook (you can find my links in the About section of this blog).